Mail vs Email Manuscript Submissions

Here at Leucrota Press, we take both postal and email manuscript submissions. Most of the submissions we receive are through email, though we do get a handful of hard copy submissions each week.

I had an email question sent to me over the weekend, regarding whether the writer should submit via post or email:

I just wanted to know which is the best way, and what option would give me the most attention/better chance. Thanks in advance!

Technically, neither method is better than the other when it comes to the acceptance of a manuscript. If you writing is fluid, the topic appropriate, and your execution both original and entertaining, then it won’t matter how you sent it in as long as we received it.

On the other hand, when referring to the “attention” part of your question, there is a slight difference. Both submission methods will get you a yes, or a personally written no. This no will include the “why” of our reasoning, and may include several comments, suggestions, or, rarely, a “stick to your day job.” (Just kidding on the last one…we use a little more tact when saying that) But for paper submissions, your manuscript may get a little more attention when it comes to your rejection.

Why? Because it’s easier to read a submission with a pen in hand and make comments, cross out redundant sentences, suggest a description, etc. than it is to use “mark up” in a word processor. It just is. No other reason. And because of this, if you submit a hard copy to us, while it may not be accepted, your chances of getting more personalized feedback beyond the written rejection letter is much higher.

While of course, I know a rejection letter is not something to look forward to, but the added suggestions and comments will hopefully help your manuscript and bring it up to the level it needs to be.

Advertisements

5 Responses

  1. I was glad to see this here. I was considering asking this question because I have been wondering about it. The thing that brought the question to mind is the difference I feel between actually holding a book and reading one on the computer. The physical book always seems to be more real. I’m sure it’s my own personal glitch but I also find it easier to get lost in the pages of a book than I do scrolling one on my palm. I enjoy digital reading but I get more satisfaction from turning the pages myself. I wondered if editors find themselves in the same situation when reading manuscripts. Such idle pondering has now become irrelevant, at least for me.

    But for paper submissions, your manuscript may get a little more attention when it comes to your rejection.

    Why? Because it’s easier to read a submission with a pen in hand and make comments, cross out redundant sentences, suggest a description, etc. than it is to use “mark up” in a word processor.

    That is probably the best reason I ever heard for sending in a hard copy. Thanks for taking the time to give your thoughts about this subject.

  2. This is so true. I sent out my novel several months ago –well, and got all no’s. Most of them I sent in by email, and just got a “no” or “didn’t like the plot.” But on two that I sent by hardcopy I actually got a few notes here and there. One was just a few crossed out lines, while the other had completely edited the first page, and put a lot of notes in the margin. It helped me realize what was wrong with my opening, and some of my style (which I was experimenting with).

    Thanks!

  3. Glad this post helped clear things up. 😉

  4. hello my name is george i live in barcelona spain
    i like your songs and your music
    Ilike know new people of the world
    i hope your letter
    your fan george thank you

  5. hi my name is rosie i live in sheffield
    i like your music i think that it is real cool music and i love it so much i am driving my mum up the wall with it
    and i like all your song
    you fan rosie

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: